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Sea Moth & Sea Robin

Sea Moth & Sea Robin

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Sea Moth

Sea Moth, any of about five species of marine fish covered with bony plates that are fused except near the movable tail. Found in the Indian and Pacific oceans, it has large, fan-like pectoral fins, prominent eyes, and an elongated, toothless snout. One species grows to a length of 17 cm (7 in) and is often dried as a curiosity and for use in traditional Chinese medicine. Sea moths have the ability to shed their skin.

Scientific classification: Sea moths make up the sole genus Pegasus of the family Pegasidae.

Sea Moth & Sea Robin
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Sea Robin

Sea Robin, also gurnard (French, grogner, “to grunt”), common names for several bottom-dwelling marine fishes. Sea robins occur throughout the world in tropical and temperate seas, most commonly in shallow water. The long, rounded body, up to 1 m (3 ft) in length but usually smaller, is covered with bony plates. The name sea robin comes from the elongated pectoral fins, the first two or three rays of which are separate and act as feelers as the fish searches for crustaceans and other small prey. The rays also serve as “walkers” and can be used to manipulate objects. The name gurnard comes from the sounds produced by the swim bladder and used for communicating with other fish.

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Scientific classification: Sea robins make up the family Triglidae of the order Scorpaeniformes.

Sea Moth & Sea Robin
Beautiful photos of Sea Robin

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